Minicomp/Wax is a heterogeneous collection of experiments, strategies, and functional components for adapting Jekyll for minimal exhibition sites.It centers on a Jekyll theme (wax) and set of Rake tasks (wax_tasks) that together enable digital humanists to create impactful sites with IIIF viewers, elastic search, and complex metadata with very little technical overhead.It is a sister project to Minicomp/Ed: Jekyll for Minimal Scholarly Editions. project context: As a set of practices and priorities, minimal computing has proven well suited to the needs of digital humanities projects and scholars. Specifically, its tenets of Minimal Dependencies, Minimal Maintenance and Minimal Presence help offset...


Course taught @ Hampshire College, January 2015. / about the course: // peer-to-peer (p2p) is often thought alongside vague ideas of ‘the commons’ and ‘the sharing economy,’ or in terms of online piracy and crowd-sourcing. but what is p2p, really? what is it not? and more importantly, what do p2p-like networks imply as a cultural model for exchanging our creative and our political efforts, our labor and our love? where did these network models come from, and where are they taking us? one of three courses sponsored by the five college digital humanities initiative, this jan-term course engages contemporary appropriations...


curatorial statement isn’t it time to rename the internet? isn’t the web 2.0 more of a cloud for falling than a net for catching? the internet’s external inter-connections have been wholly consumed—internalized and made mobile. the cloud is always simultaneously here—in our local drives, intuitively integrated with our bodies and preeminently available to them—and way over there—on servers far away, in metaphors up in the air, and peripheral to individual comprehension or control. we ask: what does this remote intimacy of the cloud imply? and what does it obscure? with the emergence of the cloud, connections of time and space...